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commitment, where we are today, in protecting the environment? >> well, it says that the protection of environment goes up and down in america. basically because of the attitude of the president. and when president reagan came in, he removed the solar panels and sent them to a college up in, i think, connecticut. now we have one of the solar panels at the carter center, the museum, and number one producer of solar panels in the world in china, also bought one of the solar panels. so they have brought a lot of money in for that small college. we need to have consistency in america and committing ourselves to preserving the environment, protecting us from global warming which is real and we need leadership coming from the white house every day saying we need to do something about global warming. that hasn't happened yet. my hope is in president obama's second term he'll be the leader of the world and not lagging behind the other nations in doing something about global warming. >> you're a nuclear engineer at one point, promoted nuclear energy. how do you make the distinction between n
what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road, and the destabilizing impact that will have on security incitement throughout the throughout the region, not just on the peninsula. >> can you follow up on some of -- was short assessment? they say they have solve whatever problems they had with her april failed launch. what's your assessment? how could they have solve the problem? wh
smiling, playing, and learning together in a safe environment. but here is the surprise. this isn't america, it's tijuana, mexico. a tough place for a child due to drugs, violence and poverty. but the first club is helping to change lives. and this is the first boys and girls club in south africa, lives are changed here and in mexico, because the children are learning that great futures start here. the expansion of the dream is due to the vision of tupperware brand's ceo, rick and his wife susan. for more than 20 years, he's been encouraging the company to make a difference through global and social responsibility. >> i think there's really a change in the role of what-- in the social contract between individuals and their governments. a lot of governments are going broke, there's a time here where corporations need to step up and find a way, not just to fund, but to put their focus, when you put funds and focus behind it, then things start to happen. >> tupperware is proof that some big businesses are big on helping others, since 1992, tupperware has been one of the leading corpo
attractive to potential employers. >> it's about creating an environment where job providers and employers will want to come to michigan, create jobs here, better jobs, more jobs. >> we have hung out the open for business sign to the world. michigan has the best trained work force. now has options and opportunities for more people. >> ifill: republican governor rick snyder agrees the law will help the state. he has promised to sign it. snyder greeted president obama when he traveled to michigan today but there was no indication that they discussed the right-to-work issue. the president was later cheered when he visited an engine assembly plant outside detroit. >> these so-called right-to-work laws they don't have to do with economics. they have everything to do with politics. what they're really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. >> ifill: 23 states have laws on the books banning the mandatory collection of union dues. in wisconsin republican governor scott walker turned aside a recall vote after he curtailed collective bargaining for public employees. voters lat
's volatile from a geopolitical standpoint. it's volatile from an environment, nature standpoint. >> rose: jeff immelt for the hour. next. >> rose: general electric is the nation's largest industrial company. it employs over 300,000 people around the world. it makes everything from aircraft engines to power plant turbines to medical imaging equipment. the company has evolved over the last decade over jeff immeant's watch. he has led a global expansion and shed once treasured businesses such as plastics and insurance. in 2011, president obama named him to lead the council on jobs and competitiveness. last month, the country created 146,000 jobs, exceeding expectations in the wake of hurricane sandy. further progress will be tested as the fiscal cliff deadline approaches without a deal inside yet. i'm very pleased to have jeff immelt back on this program. welcome >> charlie, thanks, good to be back with you. >> rose: we've talked many times about g.e. since you took over, i think once since -- just after 2001. where is the company today in terms of where do you want it to be and where do yo
want to live to 100. it's their environment. the purpose of this "new york times" article and my book "the blue zones," was really to look at the environmental components that explain longevity. >> so, dan, one of the things that fascinated me in this article, this one man in his 60s, living in america, diagnosed with cancer, given nine months to live. he moves home to ikaria and he's feeling better, working in his garden. it's 30 years later, the end of the story is he comes back to talk to the u.s. to talk to his doctors to say what do you think happened to the cancer and his doctors have passed away. it's an amazing story and anecdote but what is it specifically about the lifestyle and diet there that helps treat and prevent cancer? >> well, i think it's probably the diet. it's a very clean environment. it's not only what they eat, it's how they eat. they're not eating standing up or on the run. they tend to eat with their family. it's slow. they're overlooking the aegean. i think also if you look at their terrain, there's not more than 100 yards of flatter rain, so their whole day
us about. host: thank you for the call. speaking along the lines of the environment and the epa. there is this -- from "to the boston globe" -- this from "the l.a. times" -- from "the gazette" in colorado -- our question for you is, what the think the president's no. 1 priority should be? just is joining us on the democrat line. caller: good morning. it was a little bit of serendipity that you read the editorial from "the new york times." i believe the first priority, our entire government should be repairing the infrastructure of the country. we have some infrastructure from the 19th century. with what just happened in new york, i really do think that our treasure and our people -- repairing the infrastructure will create jobs. we also have to begin protecting our coastal communities from the mega storms. even if we just decided right now to work against climate change or to slow down climate change, it still is going to happen. it will happen. it is a mechanism that is not going to stop even if we were to stop pumping co2 into the atmosphere. we have to prepare and work to tha
and let me go into an environment and suddenly find i like honey boo boo and i'm watching its. i think that is a huge part of the experience and i think it is sold short. i still think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escapism and being able to roam around the tv jungle finding things they did not know were there. >> ice -- i think people still love discovery. every month or every year, i hear some show people are suddenly talking about that i do not think you could have ever imagines choosing. if you said, i want you to choose "honey boo boo," or a certain food channel network, i do not think i have to predetermined that was my preference. the ability to stumble on them or to hear people talking about them and let me go into an environment and babble around in that and decide, i sort of like "honey boo boo," i think that is a huge part of the american television experience. i think it gets sold short. i think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escaping and being able to roam around finding things they did not know was there. >> michael powell on the future of television.
cash. here in the low-interest rate environment, debt financing is going to be big. >> and the large cap plays. go through those. >> verifone, a leader in electronic payment devices. this has been disrupted by new players like square and paypal and google. the stock has been hit, but our fund manager we talked to think it's been unfairly hit. any time an industry is being disrupted, that's a good opportunity. >> u.s. bancorp? >> this is an old fashioned bank. focuses on deposits and loans and wealth management. none of the other stuff that can get you into trouble. this is one our clients really liked. >> this year dividend plays have been huge. everyone is looking for income. they look to these companies that have a good yield. the two that came through here were ford and, as it happens, our majority owner comcast. >> yes. so ford, you know, the auto recovery story is pretty significant. it's still happening. cars on the road are older. the replacement rate is going to go up. with ford, it has a rock-solid balance sheet. its dividend yield, we think, could go up. comcast is interest
state. >> a lot of places have drug-free work environments. now doesn't that come into question at least for today in washington state? is it the same as having a beer at lunch and coming to work? smoke a joint and come to work in what was a drug-free environment? >> it's a wonderful question. the effects will be different depending on one's tolerance. ultimately an employer has as right to expect when they employ people to come to work they are able and fit to do the job for which they were hired. certainly if there is as it relates to alcohol you're not sober and as it relates to marijuana you are a bit hazy of the mind, the employer would legally be well within their rights to take the appropriate action which means if you smoke too much, you're fired. >> guess that's a good answer to a clever conundrum they find themselves in. thank you so much. appreciate it. >>> coming up in ten minutes as well, the los angeles mayor is going to join me. he's going to talk about a federal crackdown on medical marijuana in california and now how all of this might square and he's also going to weigh
by the american people and your businesses and the economic environment worldwide. we should not accept going through that. you know, john engler, he and i philosophically do not agree on much -- [ laughter ] >> you know, i am just being honest about john. he ii a great politician. he comes from the other party. he is exactly right when he says the only thing that the debt ceiling is good for is destroying your credit rating. i want to send a very clear message to people here. we are not going to play that game next year. if congress in any way suggest that they will type negotiations to that feeling both and take us to the brink of default onne again, as part of a budget to go she asian, which, by the way, we have never done in our history, until we did it last year, i will not play that game. with that, let me just say, we have one path where we resolve this fairly quickly. we have some tough spending cuts. we have modest revenue increases. you get business certainty. you do what you do best. and, we then have an open running world next year to deal with a whole host of other issues like in
will say however that the value of doing it now in a low-interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principle and therefore this will be a more valuable thing in second, because the phones are so low interest rate, they will be on our books for a larger -- so frankly loans in the past and hit that limit so even though it's a trillion dollar portfolio, the value is actually small for the old loans and it will be quite valuable for these new worth largest rate loans. >> mr. chairman if i could have time briefly for more questions. i see that fha is now making loans to people that three years ago we were foreclosing on. and that is a very different standard than what exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes and here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores and lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis this country has faced
and using that as an opportunity to say if this environment, that is not to make things rougher for workers by hiking taxes on the well-to-do. i am over simplifying this, chris van hollen is joining me from the house of representatives, a prominent democrat. >>guest: what we are talking about here in washington, is trying to extend middle class tax cuts, to ask high income individuals to pay a little bit more to reduce our deficit because if they don't pay anymore, it means that seniors on medicare are going do have to pay a lot more and they will have lets to invest in our infrastructure and roads. it is a fight for the middle class. unions form to bargain for better wages and working conditions for workers that is why they are there. this law they are about to pass in michigan, undermines their ability to do that. >>neil: how if it gives workers a chance to say you want to be in a union or not? >>guest: it creates a free rider problem and republicans in most cases don't like free riders. i don't think anyone should. what it says is, the unions --. >>neil: but democrats don't feel --. >>gu
donald payne to require firsthand knowledge of how the workplace works and the environment in which those miners go to work every day. in the classroom, lynn woolsey continues to fight for women and working families. she was -- i want to say harsh, but i will say tough advocate. making sure that women were represented in the stem fields and the careers and women and young women had access to the sciences and to technology and to math and engineering. lynn woolsey worked to ensure kids had access at every education -- every education opportunity and a well-rounded curriculum to meet their social and emotional needs. american families have benefited from lynn woolsey's fierced a vow casey. harsh, spirited. that's our advocate, lynn. i will miss here contributions on the education committee for the years to come. she's fought tirelessly to protect the environment. most especially in the sonoma coast of san francisco bay and hopefully the president will follow her lead and designate further protections of our ocean and marine habitat in that area of our precious coast. i am very grateful for
to implement. i will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis th
will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal. therefore, this will be a more valuable change. second, because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far longer. not many loans in the past have hit that limit. even though it is $1 trillion, the value of the change is small for the old loans. it is going to be valuable for these newer, very low interest rate loans. >> briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that is a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. why are you doing that? put this is another area where we are working on changes. responsible hone owners got good credit scores that lost their jobs. we believe somebody can show that they are back to work and a responsible borer again. that is someone we would work with. i would agree that our standards are not clear enough in dividing those. so what we
'll be saving the environment on that. >> if you're tired of buying make your own. >> soda stream revolution, one-touch technology. so easy to use, put the -- check that out, put the bottle inside there, snaps in there, pick the fizz you want, press it in there, it has a monitor that lets you know how much fizz you're putting in. 60 flavors to choose from none of which have high fructose corn syrup or aspartame. >> before we go, who doesn't want to throw their iphone into water? >> put that in there. this is the first android smartphone. drop it in there. you can get without a contract, $70 from boost mobile and it's water proof, three feet in 30 minutes and it won't ruin. >> no more running for the tub of rice. there you go. thank you so much, fun ideas. really appreciate it. time right now, 7:29, 51 degrees on tv hill. stay with us. >> you're watching wbal-tv 11, live, local, late breaking. this is 11 news sunday morning. >> welcome back to 11 news sunday morning, thanks for waking up with us today. >> we're getting a check outside. is it clearing up? >> hardly, dense fog people have to wo
and be informed in an entertaining, fun environment, in a safe environment, where they can take that, what they have learned from the show and have conversations. >> it is also a tough environment. i e-mailed you before i went to see it. i said, i have a daughter that's almost 11. do you think you should bring her? >> i thought, i'm not sure. when i thought it, i saw exactly, i'm not sure. some of what happens to girls in the world is pretty ugly. >> i think girls 12 and over should see the play. i was just doing the 1 billion rising tour that we will talk about. i was in mexico city. i was with one of the women there that is fighting sex trafficking and human trafficking which $6 billion a year industry. we were just walking down the streets. there were girls, 9, 10, 11, 12, who had been sold, who had been kidnapped, raped 60 times a day. the kind of lives of women, girls across the planet is so varied. it is all part of the same story, girls not having agency over their bodies. >> on the one hand, you have monologues, often global girls telling about horrific conditions like that sexual
. they will go on record as risking a click event. they will say we did our part. no one wins in an environment where you could potentially hurl into a recession. the sense that i got from these guys is they will probably gather something. they really have too have at least the outline of a deal by friday or this weekend. i know that sounds bizarre, but they have three days to mark up a bill. three days to put it in conference. another three days to review. i am including the weekend days as they go forward here. they could change that. one would say, well, you know, we can change these rules and they can. it is either friday or potentially bust. it is a head scratch or to me that they do not see the market implications of getting something done. i know we do not have a lot of time. i think that what they will do is rush a bad deal that will be worse than no deal. i think the markets will punish them all the more. be careful. we remember when the markets fell almost 780 points. congress rushed back in action to prove another deal. a few months later the dow was down an additional amount. do not
and the environment. europe, japan and russia are also expected to continue to decline. connell: a matter of time, as they say. this fox business exclusive, we will talk about the war on business. it was a record year for anti-trust funds. dagen: the sanctions against iran. if this policy will change anything over there. the state of the economy and why it matters to you and this, the cost of crude oil. take a look at it. more than $86 a barrel. stubbornly high. ♪ >> announcer: you never know when, but thieves can steal your identity and turn your life side down. >> hi. >> hi. you know, i can save you % today if you open up a charge card account with us. >> you just read my mind. >> announcer: just one little piece of information and they caopen bogus accounts, stealing your credit, your money and ruining your reputation. that's why you need lifelock to relentlessly protect what matters most... [beeping...] helping stop crooks before your identity is attacked. and now you can have t most corehensive identity theft protection available today... lifelock ultimate. so for protection you just can't
's hard to earn an extra buck in that environment. you're seeing citi, in fact, address those concerns in the layoff announcement today. >> ifill: what does that tell bus the health of the banking sector and whether other big banking institution might be following suit? >> citigroup is not as mump an indicator species as i think people would want it to be. 15 years ago, it was the financial supermarket. it rolled everything together. it's one-stop shopping, and that mold has been called into question, not least by the architect of this model, sandy wiel, saying we should break up the big banks. gwen, i think it tells us more about the end of the era of kind of this force conglomeration of bank where's bigger is naturally better. you have seen, obviously, too big to fail banks become too bigger to fail, such as j.p.morgan, or wells fargo which bought wachovia. but there are others who find they can't hit their stride with the asset they say accummed a decade ago. >> ifill: what we're watching happening at citigroup. does that make them an outlier or a sign of things to come? >> i think
and cared about the environment. those things are important to me. when the party start eed moving away from those thing and taking away the sunday before election to vote. there's a great tradition after church to go and vote in states that have early voting. it just seemed to me there was real suppression going on, it wasn't a tolerant party, it wasn't doing what was right for the environment or public education. i'm a public school kid. my dad was on the school board when i was a kid. i have three sisters, two have been public school teachers here in florida. i have a heart for that kind of thing, and it means an awful lot to me. people have told me for a long time, chris, charlie, you have really been a democrat, you just didn't know it. i mean, these are people that i went to college with and went to law school with. >> are you going to lead the charge -- >> so i'm bloglad to be here. >> are you going to lead the charge around the country for people who were republicans to become democrats. >> i think they should if we were like me. sort of middle of the road and common sense republican
environment for anybody that is doing this, you know, there is a consideration that one must have for what it would be like to change environments like this to be out there in space and be on the moon. you wouldn't want to have somebody freak out, ed, on a trip like this. it wouldn't work out very well. >> no. you would definitely have to have your act together between your ears to do something like this. >> yes. >> there is no question about it. and that's after spending all the money. is this safe? do you anticipate this would be a safe procedure? >> yes, i do anticipate that it would be a safe procedure. after all, any of these new ventures that are coming up are required by law to be able to meet the same sort of stringent safety regulations that nasa has to meet for any of its missions. and the difference here is that nasa has spent a lot of time and money and effort to be able to iron out all of those difficulties. and the new entities that are coming on are taking advantage of the work that is being done. >> ultimate goal here. what is it? >> the ultimate goal is to get us back in s
is for the classroom environment offered at that school. >> kim, maybe this is just something that new englanders have grown up hearing but there is this idea that, you know, getting in to the right preschool means you then get in to the right prep school and then get in to the right college. please, for krystal's sake, debunk this mythology for us. >> and then you have the right life. >> yes, of course. of course, of course. it is all toward having the right life. >> unfortunately, there's some truth to that. >> oh! >> great. >> here's why. it's because the very best schools don't have very many spots and what happens is, you know, if you have a kindergarten, for example, to admit 30 students, well, if they had a preschool, chances are 70% to 90% of the students admitted in to that kindergarten went to the preschool beforehand. >> brutal. >> there may be very few spaces for kids just applying out of the blue and siblings. a lot of times getting a school starting potentially at ninth grade and potentially half of those spots could already be gone or already be earmarked for the siblings of children at
the bomb to their chest and blow up the entire environment. we saw that in october of '08 when the markets caved and we needed the t.a.r.p. reform. we saw it in july of 2011. i think they realized they have no leverage in this case. so i think it's different. and i think the key thing here to the point about slow walking the caucus, it also goes to the idea that to the victor goes though spoils. it is only at the end of the day going to show him and the republicans to be weaker and to have less leverage which giving obama more leverage on two things to your question. one is the debt ceiling extension issue which is the point that the president has made. he's not going to allow the republicans to hold this economy hostage. and another round of debt ceiling negotiations. i think he has to hold firm on that. the other thing i think the president has to hold firm on is getting stimulus in this plan. to jared's point, republicans have been making all the arguments if you cut too much you're going to hurt the economy. that's what the democrats said during the stimulus debate which jared was a le
and the ability to work with others in a competitive environment is a huge life skill. competitive sports and the extraordinary game of american football. >> what do you want for christmas? >> at least an 8-8 record by the dolphins. i know i should aim higher. >> mrs. rubio, happy birthday. we appreciate you being here. thank you for being here and thankful to the bank of america. and thank you for coming out early. senator rubio for a fantastic conversation. [applause] captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> president obama addressed a group of corporate executives today in washington. he talked about negotiations with congressional republicans on deficit reduction and the so-called fiscal cliff. >> the holdup right now is that speaker boehner took a position -- i think the day after the campaign -- that said we're willing to bring in revenue, but we aren't willing to increase rates. and i just explained to you why we don't think that works. we're not trying to -- we're not insisting on rates just out of spite or
the new jobs come, from but we have got to have an environment that creates jobs for everyone and you've done the studies yourself to show that increasing taxes on the top 2%, the portion of that that falls into small business owners who actually pass that through their personal income, is small and the portion of those that actually employs several workers is small, so i'm not arguing that taxes should go up for the rich. that's somebody else's argument to have. my point is it's not going to crush the economy to do so. >> so much heat of the conversation is just around the taxes for the rich. the jobs numbers, rear view mirror. >> absolutely. >> talking about how to fix it and how we're going to buttress the recovery. >> now we look at the future. >> ali velshi, thanks. >>> up next, america's oldest dictionary has announced the words of the year. can you tell it was an election year. which one was the most popular search in 2012. the answer after the break. health care system i wae spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my
environment should be. lou: so is it your sense that this market, this recovery right now is vulnerable given the fiscal cliff, all of the uncertainties that are -- it seems -- mounting more, the folks in washington talk. >> i'd say that this recovery is fragile. it depends, you know, it's also been very patchy. as i said, it grew from -- it's growing from a very, very low point in the economy, so you're seeing markets like phoenix, detroit, miami kind of clouding some of this information. but i would say that the fiscal cliff discussions are definitely not helping. i think consumers see the implications of tax reduction, for example, coming off -- lou: what would that do to the market if it were to be implemented? >> well, i think it'll definitely hurt the market, and i think i would not recommend doing that at this stage of recovery. lou: somehow i thought that would be your answer, as it would be for most homeowners who have gotten used to that deduction. >> sure. lou: sanjiv, great to have you. >> my pleasure. lou: sony's "skyfall" retained the top spot. the james bond movie took in anoth
in an environment in the construction business where it's a right-to-work state, and we had tremendous booms in construction with that kind of scenario. it does work, but then, you know, look at new york where it's a predominant union town and union state, and, you know, look, things get done efficiently, but it costs more money to bill union, versus nonunion, and the question you have to ask is does it impact on generates more or less jobs? neil: but do you think that the president should make a statement? no one denies that unions helped em over the finish line, passionate crowds feeled owed, and the president feels an obligatn to pay them back here, but should he make a statement, as businessmen argued, to stand and say this is one thing i'm just not with you on. i see nothing wrong with free choices. >> i think the president should speak what he think is the right way to do things, speak from his heart, speak, you know, from what his beliefs are. you know, the president, you know, the office, itsel is an office of leadership. the president's a leader, and he should articulate what his vi
an environment in which we can care for the elderly. >> the think americans will remain optimistic but this did of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with t
are in a very good environment. and in north america, obviously, is important. europe is obviously important. but you're focusing on emerging markets. >> yes. >> even putting manufacturing, which i'm not sure, why would you build -- you're building a $100 million plant in africa. why not just export to avenue from from other places? why build a plant in africa? >> we have going to affect the organization from here. this was a unique opportunity because it was a state-owned factory. we managed to take over and they needed technology. and why produce there is a huge market. there are 1 billion people right now, the population will double. >> on the continent? >> yeah. on the continent of africa. they have a problem with feud security now. they have 60% of the global reserves of tillable land, which is great news, and only 20% of this land are used today, are farms today. therefore, it is a very interesting market. i'm very proud that we discovered it first and that we will be there also the first to manufacture from the western global players. >> so private corporation. who needs to go into th
in such a highly charged political environment, that we should change the senate rules to make it more efficient, more responsive to the public mood, more like the house of representatives. i appreciate the frustration many have with the slow pace of the legislative process, thus i can understand the temptation to change the rules that make the senate so unique and simultaneously so frustrating." but senator dodd continued, "whether such a temptation is motivated by a noble desire to speed up the process, or by pure political expedience, i believe such changes would be unwise." in conclusion senator dodd said -- quote -- "we 100 senators are but temporary stewards of a unique american institution founded upon universal principles. the senate was designed to be different, not simply for the sake of variety but because the framers believed that the senate could and should be the venue in which statesmen would lift america up to meet its unique challenges." those who know both senator dodd and me know that we didn't agree on much during our years together in the senate. however, on this point i hav
nothing to remedy it. the damage we have done to our environment may be getting worse. carbon dioxide emissions were at a record high in 2011. and when the numbers in 2012 are totaled they're expected to be even worse. the efforts to cush these hammer unfortunately emissions are simply failing. the rhetoric coming out of the white house has been fine. the president obama even mentioned quote the destructive power of a warming planet in his acceptance speech last month but time for talk is over. now the is the time for action. here with me now to tell me if we should start preparing for the earth as we know it. joe rome. thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> we're very close or even maybe at a tipping point beyond which the capacity to pull back the impact of co2 pouring intoous atmosphere may well nigh impossible. >> no question it's getting--the impacts are getting more noticeable. we're seeing super storms we haven't seen before. hurricane sandy was the most destructive ever reported. it's the combination of the warmer ocean temperatures make the storms stronger,
and the environment. we're america's natural gas. why they have a raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years? no. if he can't, no one can. that's why ally has a raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. >>> almost a year after his death, kim jong ill still looms over north korea. today they erected eight statues around the city. they instribed his name and started plans to renovate the palace where his body lies in state. here is the breakdown of the cost that we found. so, how is the country paying for it? north koreans don't have the money. they are going to borrow some of it at rates like 40%. that is the amount of food that would have brought enough corn to wipe out the food shortfall. the threats that missiles pose the united states. tonight the story struck a chord with us. anderson starts now. >> tonight the top five things that america is talking about. number one, peace love and ♪ [ female announcer ] holiday
. >> except that if we go over the cliff and given how tenuous this economic environment is right now, i mean, the message that sends to business leaders, employers, let alone the american people, is this place is not only ungovernable, it is dysfunction beyond dysfunction. >> a friend of mine, a wealthy california guy, a liberal, said, if you think they're going to trust you after you miss the january 1st deadline, they'll be no trust. they'll say, if you can't meet your own deadline, why would you meet anybody else's. >> and the markets, whether it's europe or american, are pricing in a solution. you see it really quite clearly. >> somebody was on -- mcmahon yesterday was wrong, they're not pricing a failure, they're pricing in a solution. thank you, chris kofinis, for that report from greece. jared bernstein, as always, thank you. >>> when we return, let me finish with the ghost of fiscal cliff yet to come. wait until you see this story. you're watching "hardball," the place for politics. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? y
by the american people and your businesses and economic environment worldwide. through that. john engler -- he and i philosophically don't agree on much -- \[laughter] >> i'm just being honest about john, he is a great politician and comes from the other party, but john is exactly right when he says that the only thing that debt ceiling for is to destroy your credit rating. so i want to send a very clear message to people here. we are not going to play that game next year. if congress in any way suggests that they are going to tie negotiations to debt ceiling votes and take us to the brink of default once again as part of a budget negotiation, which by the way, we have never done in our history until we did it last year, i will not play that game. we have to break that habit before it starts. so, with that, let me just say, we have one path where we resolve it fairly quickly. cuts. we reform our entitlements. increases. you get business certainty and you do what you do best, innovate, hire workers, make profits, do well by your shareholders and grow america and we have open-running room next y
're in a situation where the economy is not growing there are no jobs. we're facing an inflationary environment too. it is troubling, and it is just about politics, and ideology and pushing that forward no matter what without thinking -- >> what they are saying is that obama will have to give more, than entitlement cuts and spending cuts and republicans might have to acquiesce to tax hikes. lou: what is the republican party coming, monica used expression political party suicide, i don't know if that drastic but there is a defeatism i find astonishing. >> they hope to stan strong together in one message, we need a warrior that is why i'm delighted that jim demint is leaving and going to the heritage foundation, we don't have a clear champion on our issue, senator rubio does a great job but we need more out there jan the kuh cuban guy from florida. lou: i tell you, right now, i may be insulting a lot of people, but he is the most ex fisk communicate or -- effective communicate or the republican party has but he is not talking about the fiscal cliff. >> he said we have to did is not create new taxes b
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